The table below lists the skills, knowledge, and behaviors characteristic of every student who graduates from Oregon State School of Mechanical, Industrial & Manufacturing Engineering with a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering. These Mechanical Engineering Student Outcomes are paired by the MIME Program Educational Objective with which they are most closely associated.

The Bachelor of Science and Honors Bachelor of Science degree programs in Mechanical Engineering are accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org.

 

Within three to five years of graduation, graduates in mechanical engineering will have:

Associated Mechanical Engineering Student Outcomes

PEO 1.)  Created value to organizations through the analysis, evaluation, and improvement of engineered systems and processes using appropriate mechanical engineering methods and tools.

(1) An ability to identify, formulate, and solve complex engineering problems by applying principles of engineering, science, and mathematics.



(6) An ability to develop and conduct appropriate experimentation, analyze and interpret data, and use engineering judgment to draw conclusions.



(7) An ability to acquire and apply new knowledge as needed, using appropriate learning strategies.



(aa) Ability to apply principles of engineering, basic science and mathematics (including multivariate calculus and differential equations).



(bb) Ability to model, analyze, design and realize physical systems, components or processes.

PEO 2.)  Communicated effectively across disciplines and cultures to manage and/or lead activities in support of organizational goals and objectives.

(3) An ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences.

(5) An ability to function effectively on a team whose members together provide leadership, create a collaborative and inclusive environment, establish goals, plan tasks, and meet objectives.

(cc) Ability to work professionally in either thermal or mechanical systems areas.

PEO 3.)  Innovated systems and processes, in response to organizational challenges, though the application of structured and unstructured mechanical engineering methodologies, including engineering design and problem-solving.

(1) An ability to identify, formulate, and solve complex engineering problems by applying principles of engineering, science, and mathematics.

(2) An ability to apply engineering design to produce solutions that meet specified needs with consideration of public health, safety, and welfare, as well as global, cultural, social, environmental, and economic factors.

(4) An ability to recognize ethical and professional responsibilities in engineering situations and make informed judgments, which must consider the impact of engineering solutions in global, economic, environmental, and societal contexts.

(7) An ability to acquire and apply new knowledge as needed, using appropriate learning strategies.

(bb) Ability to model, analyze, design and realize physical systems, components or processes.