Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Office: 
320 Rogers Hall
Phone: 
541.737.5614

Thermal-Fluid Sciences

Education

  • Ph.D., Mechanical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, 2013
  • MS, Aerospace Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, 2010
  • BS, Aerospace Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, 2009

Research Interests

Dr. Niemeyer’s research focuses on the development of advanced numerical methods for modeling of combustion and reactive flows. His recent efforts included developing chemical-reaction mechanism reduction tools and algorithms for graphics processing units (GPUs) in order to enable the use of detailed, accurate chemical models in combustion simulations. Other research interests include computational modeling of multi-physics flows for applications in aerospace, transportation, and energy systems.

Biography

Kyle E. Niemeyer is an Assistant Professor at the Oregon State University in the School of Mechanical, Industrial, and Manufacturing Engineering. He leads the Niemeyer Research Group, which uses computational modeling to study various phenomena involving fluid flows, including combustion and chemical kinetics, and related topics like numerical methods and parallel computing. He is also interested in open access, open source, and open science in general, and has contributed in the area of standardizing research software citation. Kyle received his Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from Case Western Reserve University in 2013, working with Jackie Sung and the Combustion Diagnostics Laboratory (now at the University of Connecticut). He received BS and MS degrees in Aerospace Engineering from Case Western Reserve University in 2009 and 2010, respectively.

Selected Publications

Tejas C. Mulky and Kyle E. Niemeyer. 2019. “Computational study of the effects of density, fuel content, and moisture content on smoldering propagation of cellulose and hemicellulose mixtures.” Proceedings of the Combustion Institute, 37(3):4091–4098. 
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.proci.2018.06.164 
arXiv:1806.08396 [physics.flu-dyn]

Katherine M. Smith, Peter E. Hamlington, Kyle E. Niemeyer, Baylor Fox-Kemper, and Nicole S. Lovenduski. 2018. “Effects of Langmuir turbulence on upper ocean carbonate chemistry.” Journal of Advances in Modeling Earth Systems, 10:3030–3048. 
https://doi.org/10.1029/2018MS001486

Christopher P. Stone, Andrew T. Alferman, and Kyle E. Niemeyer. 2018. “Accelerating finite-rate chemical kinetics with coprocessors: comparing vectorization methods on GPUs, MICs, and CPUs.” Computer Physics Communications, 226:18–29. 
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cpc.2018.01.015
arXiv:1608.05794 [physics.comp-ph]

Bryan W. Weber and Kyle E. Niemeyer. 2018. “ChemKED: a human- and machine-readable data standard for chemical kinetics experiments.” International Journal of Chemical Kinetics, 50(3):135–148.
https://doi.org/10.1002/kin.21142 
arXiv:1706.01987 [physics.chem-ph]

Daniel J. Magee and Kyle E. Niemeyer. 2018. “Accelerating solutions of PDEs with GPU-based swept time-space decomposition.” Journal of Computational Physics, 357:338–352.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcp.2017.12.028 
arXiv:1705.03162 [physics.comp-ph]

Sai Krishna Sirumalla, Morgan A. Mayer, Kyle E. Niemeyer, and Richard H. West. 2018. “Assessing impacts of discrepancies in model parameters on autoignition model performance: a case study using butanol.” Combustion and Flame 190:284–292.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.combustflame.2017.11.018
arXiv:1708.02232 [physics.chem-ph]