Oregon State School of Mechanical, Industrial, and Manufacturing Engineering

Oregon State School of Mechanical, Industrial, and Manufacturing Engineering

Next Generation Materials & Devices research excellence at the School of MIME addresses the challenges in developing breakthrough, innovative materials with increased functionality. Such research can improve energy productivity and manufacturing processes, reduce waste, and lead to numerous highly functional, high-performance materials technologies.

School of MIME materials science researchers collaborate with a variety of Oregon State centers and institutes including the Materials Synthesis and Characterization Center (MaSC) and the OSU Electron Microscope Facility. Their work is supported by the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Energy, including the National Energy Technology Laboratory, the U.S. Department of Defense, and state collaboratives such as Oregon BEST (Oregon Built Environment & Sustainable Technologies Center) and ONAMI (Oregon Nanoscience and Microtechnologies Institute) in addition to numerous industrial sponsors.

Within the School of MIME, faculty research in the areas of structural materials, biomaterials, electronic ceramics, energy materials, sensors, and bulk and thin film materials processing.

Computational Materials Science

Fundamental research combining computer simulation and theoretical modeling to investigate structures and properties of materials and how to engineer them.

Electroceramics Research

Supports research on electronic ceramic materials high-energy ceramic capacitors, high temperature capacitors, and piezoelectric materials for sensors and actuators.

Mechanical Behavior of Materials

Research on mechanical properties (e.g., deformation, fracture, fatigue, creep-fatigue) of advanced structural materials and biomaterials, including metals, ceramics, intermetallics, interfaces, composites, and biological materials.

Multi-Functional Thin Film Materials Research

Research on microstructure, processing, and property relationships in functional thin film materials. Oregon State School of Mechanical, Industrial, and Manufacturing Engineering

Nuclear Materials and Metallurgy

Materials degradation and alloy development research for harsh environments. Computational methods and fundamental experiments are coupled to explain degradation mechanisms and predict component lifetime performance. Focus areas include: phase transformations, irradiation damage and supercritical CO2 corrosion.